Zoom Logo

Rhinos back on the radar: Uncovering the latest threats - Shared screen with speaker view
Natalia Banasiak
38:40
https://cites.org/sites/default/files/documents/E-CoP19-75.pdf
Natalia Banasiak
38:43
https://rhinos.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/IUCN-AfRSG-Rhino-Facts-and-Figures-WRD2022.pdf​
Nabeelah Khan
54:45
Please remember to use the Q&A section to post your questions.
Shaheena Links
01:12:38
Very interesting talk
Shaheena Links
01:12:59
Very interesting talk
Andrew Purdon
01:14:07
Thank you for an informative talk Khungeka,Jo, and Sarah.
Milla Palmer
01:15:58
This is fascinating - thanks to all for sharing their expertise.
PAUL ANDRE DEGEORGES
01:17:02
My chat is now enabled: I believe the comment by the first presenter about the importance of getting community buy-ins is critical. Kicking people off their land in the name of conservation to save the rhino, etc. in my experience is a big mistake. I believe programs like what TUT grad Paulus Arnold is doing in the community conservancies of Northern Namibia - he manages is the way to go. Traditional hunting for certain species is allowed. In Cameroon and other Francophone countries, Chasse Libre programs allow traditional hunting for certain species to feed family/community, as with Paulus Arnold's program. In addition, traditional hunters guide trophy hunters. The key is that traditional hunters are made part of the solution instead of being seen as part of the problem and it is they who spend significant time in the bush - who keep both community members and outsiders from poaching critical species such as rhino.Agreed - often the political/bureaucratic/corporate elite take advantage of poverty to have
PAUL ANDRE DEGEORGES
01:17:30
Agreed - often the political/bureaucratic/corporate elite take advantage of poverty to have them poach. The poor take all the risk and the elite make the real profits. In addition to integrating the communities into rhino/willife conservation, a key mut be going after these elites!!! Too bad South Africa's Endangered Species Protection Unit (ESPU) of the South African Police was disbanded. ESPU's in one form or another are needed across the Sub-Continent!!Also, private game ranchers and rhino in Southern Africa are important. CITES banning trade risk to take away the economic incentives of private game ranchers to conserve rhino!!
Marvin Mwarangu
01:18:37
Thank you for the webinar. You've helped me articulate parts of my role well and consider new aspects of rhino conservation.
Marcelino Foloma
01:19:17
How do you see relationship between development/globalization and wildlife crime?
Vusi Tshabalala
01:19:33
Thanks for the information, we are on the right track, we just need the political buy in and backed up by policy
Dr Llewellyn Taylor
01:19:59
Thank you for the two talks, from WESSA-Lowveld!
Blaz Haugland
01:20:23
Thank you all for the presentation
Blaz Haugland
01:20:27
All the best!
Lucian Moses
01:21:54
😇
Isaac Lenaola
01:22:10
Thank you all.Very informative.
FanikioL
01:23:43
Thanks for the presentation. I have learned a lot. I think you should add more time for the next webinar.
Leigh Henry
01:24:00
Thanks so much, Jo and Sarah!
Daniel Stiles
01:24:13
Thank you Jo and Sarah very informative
Janet Bloom
01:24:32
Thank you so much for a very informative session
Nicolas Tubbs
01:24:54
Many thanks, excellent webinar!
Eitan Prince
01:25:05
Very interesting insights. Thank you, Jo, Sarah & Khungeka.
Marcelino Foloma
01:25:53
Very exciting presentations. Thanks Jo and Sarah and the facilitation from Khungeka
Christiaan van der Hoeven
01:26:03
thanks all for this interesting webinar!
Dr Llewellyn Taylor
01:26:14
Thank you, looking forward to the recording.
Joanna Choblet
01:26:15
For those interested in the WJC's work on crime convergence, you can find more information here: https://wildlifejustice.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Crime-Convergence-Report-2021.pdf
Geoffrey C.
01:26:20
thank you
Karen Gabriels
01:26:22
thank you all, a very interesting webinar
Sammi LI
01:26:28
thank you for bye